Effectiveness of Various Methods of Teaching Proper Inhaler Technique: The Importance of Pharmacist Counseling

This article delves into the role of a pharmacist in patient inhaler education.  There were four different interventions that were compared in this study. The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of direct patient education vs. video or print education.

  1. Patient reads a metered dose inhaler (MDI) package insert pamphlet.
  2. Patient watches a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) video demonstrating MDI technique.
  3. Patient watches a YouTube video demonstrating MDI technique
  4. Pharmacist gives patient direct instruction of MDI technique (2 minutes long)

This study had a patient population of 72 and each was screened for demographic information, including literacy. All patients used inhalers. These patients were randomized to one of the four interventions and then evaluated by their ability to demonstrate proper inhaler technique using a placebo MDI. The effectiveness of each intervention was measured by the patient’s ability to complete each step of proper inhaler technique, and no partial credit was given. The result of the study showed that only 29.2% of the patients were able to do this correctly. There was also a statistically significant increase in correct inhaler technique in the group of patients given direct inhaler technique education.

This study showed that pharmacists can positively influence patent inhaler outcomes (in comparison to other methods) by giving direct patient education. This is important for the advancement of our profession because it shows that we can provide care outside of simply dispensing medications. Studies like this may provide a framework for allowing pharmacists to provide other services.

What other services do you see pharmacists being able to provide in the future?

View the article here:

Axtell S, Haines S, Fairclough J. Effectiveness of Various Methods of Teaching Proper Inhaler Technique: The Importance of Pharmacist Counseling. J Pharm Pract. 2016 Feb 23. pii: 0897190016628961.

Implementation and outcomes of a pharmacist-managed clinical video telehealth anticoagulation clinic

This article intrigued me because it was look at innovated health practices for pharmacists.  As a class, we heard a lot about these types of practices from Profession of Pharmacy 1, but I rarely ever saw them in practice.

In this case study, the investigators looked at the use of clinical video technology to optimize the use of pharmacy specialty resources in a community-based outpatient clinic.

The pharmacists in this experiment where located about 12 miles away from the practice site and used videoconferencing to conduct patient interviews, evaluate INRs and gather other data.  The study found that a high level of patient satisfaction was maintained and pharmacist resources were able to be allocated to other duties.

I think that this something that we will be seeing more and more often in practice.  I think that at the current time there are some members of the older population that are skeptical of this idea, but as our generation becomes older, I believe businesses will see the advantage in this and begin implementing it.  What do you think?

Singh LG, Accursi M, Black KK.  Implementation and outcomes of a pharmacist-managed clinical video telehealth anticoagulation clinic.  Am J Health Syst Phar.  2015;72:70-73.  

Pharmacist-led screening program for an inner-city pediatric population

This study was conducted to see how inner city children are affected by asthma, hypertension, obesity, and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure. This study took place in lower socioeconomic communities throughout Pittsburgh and pharmacists and student pharmacists ran 12 health screenings on 144 children over the course of 2 years.

The study found that 16% of the children were already diagnosed with asthma before the screenings, and 18% had potential asthma. More than half of the children were not at a healthy weight (0.7% were underweight and the remaining were either overweight or obese), and 24% had abnormal blood pressure. 26% of the children had exposure to ETS comparable to that of smokers.

Over the course of this study, nearly 200 referrals were made by the pharmacists. This study is important because it shows how at risk the children in our own community are for conditions that could greatly affect their health outcomes. It also shows how critical of a role pharmacists could play in screening and preventing diseases among children who face numerous health disparities. Screening programs such as this can be implemented by pharmacists in other communities, especially those of even lower socioeconomic status than the one studied, to help lower health disparities among inner city populations of children.

Elliott JP, Harrison C, Konopka C, et al. Pharmacist-led screening program for an inner-city pediatric population. J Am Pharm Assoc. 2003;55:413-8.