Duration of diabetes and its association with depression in later life: The Health In Men Study (HIMS).

This study compared the diagnosis of diabetes and it’s relationship to depression in men.  It was a cross-sectional study of 5462 men between the age of 70-89 years old.  The rate of these men’s depression was based on the Geriatric Depression Scale and diabetes was measured with fasting blood glucose levels.  There is a “J-shaped” curve relationship between depression and age with men with diabetes.  That means that depression increases as the men get older.  Although some other factors most likely play a pivotal role.

I was interested in this article because these disease states are treated by medications that pharmacists deal with on a daily basis.  To me, this emphasizes the importance of the pharmacist role in patient’s lives.  The better the patient’s diabetes is managed, the better their related depression might be treated.  if the diabetes is under control, the depression will not occur hopefully and therefore, there will not be a need for additional medical treatment.  The less medication needed, the better the life of the patient.

Almeida OP, McCaul K, Hankey GJ, et al.  Duration of diabetes and its association with depression in later life: The Health In Men Study (HIMS). 2016; 86: 3-9

Comparison between Transdermal Buprenorphine and Transdermal Fentanyl for Postoperative Pain Relief after Major Abdominal Surgeries

Opioid medication has been used since its discovery as the necessary treatment for moderate and severe pain, especially post-operative pain.  It is one of the main concerns for patients who undergo such major surgeries such as abdominal surgery.  This study compares the effectiveness of two transdermal medications and their effectiveness on 60 patients.  Half the population was given transdermal fentanyl and half the population was given transdermal buprenorphine.  The results were to be expected.  Around 20% of fentanyl and 16.7% of buprenorphine patients experienced adverse effects, nausea and vomiting being the main adverse effects for most patients.  In general, however, fentanyl was reported to be better at controlling post-operative pain than buprenorphine.  This study also proved that transdermal patches are preferable to oral and IV administration.  This is due to the avoidance of multiple dosing and skin punctures.

I find this article interesting because opioid medications interest me and their varying effectiveness.  Pain is the most common effect patients experience and its management can be a difficult task.  So this study interested me since it compared two different pain medications for post-operative abdominal pain.  I was familiar with fentanyl but not buprenorphine.  Overall, fentanyl still proved to be the most effective.

 

Arshad Z, Prakash R, Gautam S, Kumar S. Comparison between Transdermal Buprenorphine and Transdermal Fentanyl for Postoperative Pain Relief after Major Abdominal Surgeries. Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research : JCDR. 2015;9(12):UC01-UC04. doi:10.7860/JCDR/2015/16327.6917.