Effect of Behavioral Interventions on Inappropriate Antibiotic Prescribing Among Primary Care Practices

In this article, the scientists involved looked at the effects of behavioral interventions and rates of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing during ambulatory visits for acute respiratory tract infections.  The experiment had clinicians held responsible for their antibiotic prescriptions in 3 ways: they were either given electronic alternative suggestions, had to enter a rationale for prescribing into the patient chart, or had to report their prescribing numbers to a group of other clinicians.  The study found that two of the interventions had a statistically significant impact on the rates of antibiotic prescriptions. Having the clinicians enter rationale for their prescriptions and reporting their prescribing numbers to peers both reduced the number of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infection.

I think that this article is really interesting because we all know that there is a widespread problem with antibiotics.  We know that antibiotic resistance is becoming more and more of a serious threat. If there is a way that we may reduce the number of  antibiotic prescriptions that could have a significant impact on fighting/reducing resistance.

Reference:

Meeker D, Linder JA, Fox CR, et al. Affect of behavioral interventions on inappropriate antibiotic prescribing among primary care practices. JAMA 2016; 315(6):562-570.

Effect of Behavioral Interventions on Inappropriate Antibiotic Prescribing Among Primary Care Practices